Monthly Archives: December 2011

It seems that almost every live performance I attend ends with a standing ovation. My British friends, with a tinge of cultural imperialism, are quick to point out that this is a uniquely American phenomenon (another hypothesis to refute). I … Continue reading

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If a genie rose in a stream of twisted blue smoke and offered me, free of charge, an all expenses paid research study of my dreams, I would know immediately what to say. It would be a longitudinal study of … Continue reading

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I’m not afraid to admit it – I’m a fan of TV dance shows, especially So You Think You Can Dance! So, at the top of my holiday research wish list is the opportunity to work with SYTYCD to develop … Continue reading

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With all of the recent interactive, community-based creative endeavors (e.g., Popup Magazine, Aaron Koblin‘s distributed works), and the allure of the all-night project (e.g., 24 Hour Plays), the research project I wish for is to engage a larger community in … Continue reading

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Although I don’t have an iPhone or Mac, my wife and children all do, which has helped me to understand the outpouring of consumer grief at the recent death of Apple CEO Steve Jobs. I’ve been struck in reading the … Continue reading

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An exchange of articles got me wondering whether the lens of creative economy that is applied to highlight the benefits of increased focus on creativity, arts, and culture gets us off on the wrong foot. Creative economy (a term popularized … Continue reading

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I was recently speaking with someone about performing an evaluation of a music education program for young children. Given the relatively small number of children enrolled in the program (approximately 100), we discussed the possibility of collaborating with other similar … Continue reading

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