Monthly Archives: June 2009

There are few art forms in which the artist’s tools, techniques, and processes are being as dramatically transformed by digital technologies as photography. An interesting juxtaposition: the loss of important film stocks, most recently Kodachrome, which Kodak will soon retire, … Continue reading

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In reading about the remarkable 60-year tenure of Stanley Drucker as principal clarinet of the New York Philharmonic I thought about legacies in the performing arts. How does a great performer or creator establish a legacy? Surely it helps to … Continue reading

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The much that’s being made of Internet communications lately (Facebook “families” proliferating like crazy, “tweets” emanating from Iran) has reminded me of something I loved as a kid – comic books with their blips of word and image. And that … Continue reading

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In a recent article in the New York Review of Books about the late John Updike, Julian Barnes discusses the fact that this great writer never received the Nobel Prize for Literature. There is certainly much prestige associated with the … Continue reading

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In his book The Tyranny of Dead Ideas, Matt Miller challenges many long-held assumptions about societal norms. He posits that some core beliefs, which are “dubious at best and often dead wrong, are on a collision course with economic developments … Continue reading

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Several weeks ago I visited Catherine Bunting, head of research for Arts Council England (ACE), in her London office. We compared our research ‘wish lists’ and talked about the growing demands of public and private sector authorizers in both of … Continue reading

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