Author Archives: Caroline Marshall

Several of my WolfBrown colleagues have been working tirelessly to promote the understanding that art education, as well as greater focus on math and science, is critical to the creativity and innovation that drive our economic growth and vitality – … Continue reading

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Conversations with nonprofit leaders about evaluation and accountability usually focus on intended outcomes, impacts, and benefits and how to measure them. In our evaluation work, however, we often observe unintended outcomes, which can be favorable or unfavorable. Recently I ran … Continue reading

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Back in 2002 James Allen Smith addressed the Museum Trustee Association and Getty Leadership Institute and asked “What do economics have to do with culture?” He noted the “pressure we are under to justify our work in instrumental or utilitarian … Continue reading

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The much that’s being made of Internet communications lately (Facebook “families” proliferating like crazy, “tweets” emanating from Iran) has reminded me of something I loved as a kid – comic books with their blips of word and image. And that … Continue reading

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At WolfBrown, we think a lot about effectiveness and impact and how to frame our understanding and assessment of them. I was recently fascinated by an article in the Chronicle of Philanthropy detailing the Gates Foundation’s innovative effort to assess … Continue reading

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We at WolfBrown have been saddened to note the imminent passing of an organization with which we have had a long and happy acquaintance. As of April 1st the Fund for Folk Culture will close its office in Austin, Texas … Continue reading

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One of the things I love about assessing an initiative is hearing stories that, taken together, offer up a richly textured and meaningful narrative. One I encountered recently speaks volumes about the lifelong impact that studies are likely to have … Continue reading

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I was among the almost two million who withstood the cold January 20th to watch President Obama take the oath, and one of the quieting throngs of euphoric, dancing masses, as the Washington Post later characterized it, whose mood “changed … Continue reading

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